Ten Horsemen of the Educational Apocalypse

It's impossible to conceive of different ways to think about education without first identifying and momentarily suspending our most basic (and usually unexamined) assumptions. The illustration below is an attempt to assess our current, common, core beliefs about education. I intend to write follow-up posts about the Ten Horsemen … and the language, policies, and … Continue reading Ten Horsemen of the Educational Apocalypse

Public education: mass producing the indolent consumer

I have a friend who's a teacher educator, who alternates between amusement and despair at the intellectual and bureaucratic chasm between teacher training curricula and current research on teaching & learning, on the one hand … and between research on teaching & learning and the school quality measures that drive teacher ed curricula, on the … Continue reading Public education: mass producing the indolent consumer

School Accountability, Feedback Systems, and Cupcake Contests

“Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”     – Albert Einstein – My friend Sam is a gravitational physicist who recently made a disappointing foray into high school teaching. In his late career enthusiasm for kindling new flames of lifelong interest by sharing his research passions with high … Continue reading School Accountability, Feedback Systems, and Cupcake Contests

Their unique place

Even if there is some content knowledge that a culture deems truly necessary for every, single, solitary citizen, are we to believe that transmitting that body of skill and knowledge should take all of the first 18 years of life, that it must necessarily be delivered to all children (sorted by birthdate) in lockstep, and that individualizing education goals on the basis of strength, interest, and local resources should not begin until maturity?